In Memory of Matthew Burke

Dr Matthew Burke – died February 6, 2011

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/augustachronicle/obituary.aspx?pid=148510935

Dr. Matthew Patrick Burke, Major US Army, died on February 6, 2011 at The Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center at Fort Gordon. At the time of his passing, Matt was surrounded by his loving family and was in the dedicated care of his Army colleagues….
Matthew was decorated for his service during a deployment to Al Asad Air Force Base in Iraq. He returned to Eisenhower Army Medical Center and was serving as the Chief of Adult Joint Reconstruction for the Orthopedic Surgery Service at Eisenhower Medical Center at Fort Gordon. Matthew was a courageous athlete and an accomplished skier, rower, cyclist, and wakeboarder. He completed the RAGBRAI bicycle tour across the state of Iowa three times with his siblings; the final time joined also by his wife Bonnie.
Matt had an extraordinary range of interests, hobbies, and friends. Matthew is survived by his wife Bonnie; eleven month-old daughter Anna Ryan; parents Dr. John and Andrea Burke of Salt Lake City, Utah; sister Erin, brothers Paul and Ted (Kim), and nephew Matthew John. Matt is also survived by his aunt Patricia Keane Kennedy (John) and uncles Paul Keane and Robert Keane, S.J. (Captain, USN). Matt is also survived by his parents-in-law Rod and Jean of Du Bois, Pennsylvania, and sister-in-law Katie (Joel). The Burke Family wishes to thank the medical team at MCG for its care of Matthew. The Burke Family also expresses its heartfelt thanks to the civilian and Army colleagues who cared for him at Eisenhower Army Medical Center. The Burke Family also wishes to acknowledge and thank Matt’s many friends and Army colleagues for their support since October 2010.  Read the full article

Veteran stops in Davie on awareness-raising bike ride to Alaska

Veteran stops in Davie on awareness-raising bike ride to Alaska

By Wayne K. Roustan, Sun Sentinel |6:52 p.m. EDT, March 14, 2014 | Click here for a link to the original story

Tom von Kaenel is on a 6,600-mile mission to raise awareness about the battles some veterans continue to fight after their tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan.

He stopped for a ceremony at Davie Town Hall on Friday during his bicycle trip from his South Carolina home to Key West, where he will turn around and head for Juneau, Alaska.

The Sea2Sea 2014 Challenge is expected to take four months, but it’s not the first time von Kaenel has gone the extra mile. He rode his bike from Washington state to Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia in 2011.

The retired lieutenant colonel, 58, chose this path while recovering from injuries sustained on vacation in the French Pyrenees in 2010. He was recuperating in a U.S. military hospital in Germany, where he saw many young veterans returning from the Persian Gulf.

He is also making the ride for veterans such as Janos V. Lutz, who served in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2007 to 2009. The 24-year-old Marine took his own life when he returned home to Davie, said his mother. Janine Lutz.

Lutz cited post-traumatic stress disorder and the anti-malaria drug mefloquine, also known by its brand name Lariam, which her son had been ordered to take during and after his service, as contributing to his death. “The side effects are…paranoia, hallucinations,” she said. “My son had all of that.” Last September, the Army banned the use of the drug among special operations forces.

Lutz is working with von Kaenel to make people aware of the dangers of PTSD and some of the drugs prescribed for it. She’s also trying to launch the Buddy Up-Live To Tell program for peer support among veterans.
“When [my son] was in his darkest hour, I couldn’t help him,” she said. “But I know if I had gotten some of his battle buddies here they would have saved my son.”

wkroustan@tribune.com or 954-356-4303

Copyright © 2014 including images, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska The names of 345 Florida soldiers who died in Iraq & Afghanistan fill a table after each of their names were read outloud during a memorial service honoring them and also those who have committed suicide suffering from PTSD. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /March 14, 2014)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska
The names of 345 Florida soldiers who died in Iraq & Afghanistan fill a table after each of their names were read outloud during a memorial service honoring them and also those who have committed suicide suffering from PTSD. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /March 14, 2014)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska (left to right) Town of Davie Mayor Judy Paul, veteran Tom von Kaenel and others read the names of soldiers who died in Iraq & Afghanistan and those who have committed suicide because of PTSD. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /March 14, 2014)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska
(left to right) Town of Davie Mayor Judy Paul, veteran Tom von Kaenel and others read the names of soldiers who died in Iraq & Afghanistan and those who have committed suicide because of PTSD. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /March 14, 2014)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska After getting off his bike veteran Tom von Kaenel is greated by fellow veterans (left) Jack Parsons and (right) Drew Karoblis Friday in Davie. Von Kaenel is riding his bike 6600 miles from Key West to Alaska to raise awareness and support for the problems veterans face, including PTSD. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /March 14, 2014)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska
After getting off his bike veteran Tom von Kaenel is greated by fellow veterans (left) Jack Parsons and (right) Drew Karoblis Friday in Davie. Von Kaenel is riding his bike 6600 miles from Key West to Alaska to raise awareness and support for the problems veterans face, including PTSD. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /March 14, 2014)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska Daniel Iarco plays taps during a memorial service for soldiers who have committed suicide due to PTSD and soldiers who have died in from Iraq & Afghanistan. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /July 27, 2013)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska
Daniel Iarco plays taps during a memorial service for soldiers who have committed suicide due to PTSD and soldiers who have died in from Iraq & Afghanistan. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /July 27, 2013)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska Veteran Tom von Kaenel is escorted into the Town of Davie City Hall Friday afternoon during his 6600 miles from Key West to Alaska to raise awareness and support for the problems veterans face, including PTSD. He passed through Davie for a 30-minute ceremony honoring soldiers from Iraq & Afghanistan. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /March 14, 2014)

Veteran bikes Key West to Alaska
Veteran Tom von Kaenel is escorted into the Town of Davie City Hall Friday afternoon during his 6600 miles from Key West to Alaska to raise awareness and support for the problems veterans face, including PTSD. He passed through Davie for a 30-minute ceremony honoring soldiers from Iraq & Afghanistan. (Taimy Alvarez / Sun Sentinel /March 14, 2014)

Pedaling with Pride Down Memory Lane, Guest Blogger: Greg Bauld

Guest Blogger, Greg Bauld

greg bauldOne of the best things about growing older is you get extra chances to do things you love with people you love.

That just happened to me this week as I got the opportunity to cycle thru the state I love with one of my very best friends. When Thomas told me that I should ride with him to Columbia, I was really intrigued. Initially excited, that excitement turned to trepidation after my training started!!

I quickly realized that I’m not as young as I thought I was. But with his encouragement, I set off with my great friend Saturday morning from Tillman Hall in Clemson, SC. Little did I know that I was about to embark on 2 of the very best days of my life.

As we left Clemson University that morning, I was reminded how much I love that university. Then we pedaled thru my present town of Pendleton right by my house where the most important person in my life, my wife Denise, was waving and encouraging us.

From there we set out on a journey that allowed me to enjoy my friend but also the beautiful landscape of the state that I love. As we moved on down the back roads of South Carolina, I was reminded of the many blessings that God has given me. As we moved thru Pelzer, I was so excited to see one of my very dearest friends Verna Ballinger who drove 30 miles to cheer us on.

How cool is that??

We continued on til we got to Newberry where Tom led a very emotional Memorial honoring the men and women who have given the ultimate sacrifice for their country and their families and friends who are left to pick up the pieces after the loss of their loved ones. I can’t thank Thomas enough for allowing me to join in that Memorial.

The next morning we headed to our capital city of Columbia where I knew my beautiful daughter Katie and her husband Bobby would be waiting for us along with Denise and her friend Yvette from Senator Lindsey Grahams office. As we pedaled up Main Street in Columbia on Sunday morning, a sense of pride, accomplishment and gratitude totally engulfed me.

I was and always will be so proud that my friend Thomas Von Kaenel shared these 2 days with me. I urge everyone who is reading this blog, go dust off your old bicycle. Look on Sea2Sea.org and find out when Tom is coming thru your area.

Take the time to reconnect with the great feeling of doing something for your body and your mind. Remind yourself how important friends and family are to you. Ride, even if only a mile or two, through the state that you love and be reminded of our fallen heroes who have allowed us to enjoy all these blessings.

Godspeed to you Thomas!! My prayers will be with you and an ice cold adult beverage will await you on your safe return!!   ~ greg

Cross-country cyclist memorializes fallen warriors

By AL HACKLE ahackle@statesboroherald.com

Link to Original Article

Tom von Kaenel of Six Mile, S.C., reads the name of a 19-year-old soldier who was killed in action in Iraq during a brief memorial ceremony at City Hall Wednesday afternoon. Von Kaenel stopped in Statesboro for the night during his journey from Six Mile to Key West, Fla., and then to Juneau, Alaska, in honor of all troops killed during combat in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Tom von Kaenel of Six Mile, S.C., reads the name of a 19-year-old soldier who was killed in action in Iraq during a brief memorial ceremony at City Hall Wednesday afternoon. Von Kaenel stopped in Statesboro for the night during his journey from Six Mile to Key West, Fla., and then to Juneau, Alaska, in honor of all troops killed during combat in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Stopping in Statesboro on a planned 6,000-mile-plus bicycle journey across America, Tom von Kaenel led roughly 50 people in a brief memorial service in the lobby of City Hall to Georgians who died in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

Cards with information on each of Georgia’s 209 dead from the recent combat were issued to the local people. Following von Kaenel’s instructions, they read the name, rank, age, hometown and date of death of each fallen warrior before laying the cards one by one around a folded flag.

With everyone reading at once, the sound became a sort of room-filling murmur, then trailed off until there were three deceased veterans left, then two, then one.

“If we do this simultaneously, in a low, measured, prayerful way, people can get an idea of the chaos that occurs when a life is taken. …,” von Kaenel had said. “It’s very, very overwhelming when you hear all these voices.”

He read the last himself, “Worthington, Robert A., Private First Class … just 19 years old.” Georgia’s dead from the recent wars range in age from 18-57. Worthington, from Jackson, died May 22, 2007, in Iraq. The flag von Kaenel brought for the purpose had flown, he said, over the U.S. Capitol and in combat areas in both Afghanistan and Iraq.

Von Kaenel, who departed Clemson, S.C., on Saturday, intends to conduct similar rituals in cities across America as he rides. His path will take him down to Key West, Fla., back up to Florida’s capital, Tallahassee, and on through 10 more states and a number of their capitals, from Montgomery, Ala., to Juneau, Alaska. He plans to arrive in Juneau on July 4, then fly back to Atlanta on his way to a July 8 homecoming in Clemson.

He chairs a nonprofit corporation, Sea2Sea, founded in 2012, whose goals are to remind Americans of those who gave their lives and to promote charitable organizations that benefit veterans and military families. Sea2Sea collects no money itself, he said. He and three other Sea2Sea riders in 2012 bicycled 4,200 miles from the Pacific shore of Washington state to Arlington National Cemetery at Washington, D.C. This time he is riding solo.

A resident of Six Mile, S.C., near Clemson, von Kaenel, 58, retired from the Army in 1997 as a lieutenant colonel, but never served in combat. Instead, the incident he credits as inspiration was a 2010 crash during a bike ride in the Pyrenees Mountains of France. He was airlifted from a French hospital to a U.S. military hospital in Landstuhl, Germany, and found himself surrounded by American service members wounded in the wars.

Mayor Jan Moore welcomed von Kaenel to Statesboro and took part in the ceremony.

“I think I can look around the room and everybody will agree it was very moving,” Moore said. “I don’t think people knew really quite what to expect, but it couldn’t have been a better way to celebrate Ash Wednesday.”

Al Hackle may be reached at (912) 489-9454.

In Memory of Daniel L Dickinson

In Memory of – March 5 Ride – Augusta, GA to Statesboro, GA

Dr Daniel L. Dickinson – died August 1, 2011

Excerpts from the Articles:

A Fort Gordon doctor died Monday after being struck by a car while traveling to work on his bicycle.

Dr. Daniel L. Dickinson, 57, is the second Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center doctor to die from a cycling incident in the past six months.

According to Richmond County sheriff’s Capt. Scott Gay, Dickinson was riding his bicycle near the intersection of Belair and Asbury roads around 6:30 a.m. when a 2003 Buick Regal driven by 76-year-old Charlie Bussey struck him from behind.

Gay said those who knew Dickinson “said he rides his bike from his house off of Walton Way to Fort Gordon a couple of times a week.” … Read the full article

One role in particular was repeated more than any other, though, when those who knew Dickinson talked about him Tuesday: encourager.

“He was just an optimistic person, always with a smile on his face,” said Phil Cohen, whose relationship with Dickinson goes back 20 years.

For Cohen, the owner of the Chain Reaction bicycle shop in Martinez, Dickinson was an encourager on the long training rides they would take out of Augusta. If Cohen ever fell back, Dickinson always slowed and pumped him up with his words.

“He wouldn’t leave me behind,” Cohen said.

Dickinson was a longtime cyclist and even crossed the country in 1993′s Race Across America. He was pedaling to work at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center around 6:30 a.m. Monday when he was hit from behind by a car. He died a few hours later from his injuries; he was 57…. Read the full Article

 

A retired soldier is paying back what he says is a debt to the U.S. army

3352485_G

Posted: Mar 04, 2014 4:40 PM EDT Updated: Mar 04, 2014 4:40 PM EDT

Written by Elizabeth Hughes, Reporter | Link to Original Article

3352485_GA retired soldier from South Carolina is paying back what he says is a debt to the US Army. His journey started Monday, and his second stop was USC Aiken, South Carolina.

Tom Von Kaenel has vowed to ride his bicycle from the tip of the Florida Coast to Alaska to show his appreciation to the U.S. Military for saving his life.  

It’s hard to believe that just four years ago, retired vet Tom Von Kaenel was in a life threatening bicycle accident that left him with a shattered hip and broken pelvis. He was transported to military hospital in France where he says, hospital staff saved his life.

 Now he plans to ride his bicycle across the U.S. to honor the people that saved him.  “Thank you, this is my way of giving back pure and simple.”

Kaenel’s bike tour is sponsored by the Sea2Sea U.S. Military non-profit organization. An organization that’s purpose is to give back to those who served.  USC Aiken’s veteran Military Student Success Center’s Robert Murphy says having the event on Campus is the best way to bring notoriety to the youth of South Carolina.  “but the interesting thing I think will take place tonight, I when they are away from their friends and back in their dorm, they are going to contemplate on what they just heard and what they just saw-and it might cause them to go a little bit deeper in their studies whether its religion philosophy, why do people go to war and maybe cause them to go a little bit deeper.”

The students I spoke with at UCS Aiken, on campus had no idea Von Kaenel would be showing up, and say after hearing his story, they are rooting for him whole heartedly.

Ally Brown, a student said Tuesday, “It just made me love, and respect the military even, more and want to encourage them.”

Danielle Seibert, another student says, “it makes me really grateful and thankful for not only my family but everyone else serving in the military, because we take that for granted on a daily basis.”

Von Kaenel says being here with the students is just the start of his long journey, and he hopes that sharing his story will remind the students of the dedication and commitment the U.S. Army has for Americans. “This kind of event changes your life because you see the depth, the devotion and sacrifice these men and women servicemen make.”

Von Kaenel should finish his journey in July, and says the road won’t be easy but it’s the least he could do to thank the men and women who saved his life.

Cross-country bike ride to highlight veterans’ needs

Link to Original Article

Cross-country bike ride to highlight veterans’ needs

By Michael EadsPosted February 28, 2014 at 9 p.m., updated February 28, 2014 at 9:10 p.m.

CLEMSON — A Six Mile native will ride his bicycle coast to coast this spring to raise awareness of veterans’ issues.

A crowd of over 100 students, veterans and well wishers gathered Friday afternoon in the Scroll of Honor Memorial across from Memorial Stadium to send off Tom von Kaenel on the Sea2Sea 2014 Challenge. Von Kaenel’s ride will take him from Key West, Fla., to Juneau, Alaska — a four-month trip covering 7,000 miles. A 2011 ride took him from Washington State to Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

“From my perspective, I’ve got to do something and this is what I’m doing,” von Kaenel told the crowd.

 

Sea 2 Sea remembers fallen and living military

None

The Army veteran was inspired to work on behalf of returning Iraq and Afghanistan soldiers after recuperating in a U.S. military hospital in Germany in 2010 from injuries suffered during a vacation in the French Pyrenees mountains. Once recovered, he dedicated himself to raising money and awareness for organizations that serve the needs of this newest generation of American combat veterans.

Von Kaenel also shared the story of Travelers Rest resident Jason Scott Roth, a Marine lance corporal who took his own life last fall after waiting over a year for mental health treatment from the Department of Veterans Affairs. He said nearly one veteran takes his or her own life every hour on average because of being unable to get needed help and being unable to adjust to life back home.

One old friend showed up unannounced Friday to show his support for von Kaenel’s work for military veterans.

“I know Tom puts a lot of heart in it,” U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham told the crowd. “I think most of us wish we could do more. We’re all trying to figure out what we can do.”

The ceremony included the reading of over 90 names of Upstate soldiers who have died serving in Iraq and Afghanistan and a rifle salute. The names were read by cadets from the Clemson Corps, the university’s ROTC program.

Von Kaenel shared the podium with volunteers from various Upstate groups working to help local veterans transition back to civilian life, including JD-3 Veterans Organization (www.JD-3.org), Upstate Warrior Solution (www.upstatewarriorsolution.com) and Honoring Their Service, a Keowee Key effort that can be found on Facebook.

Anyone wanting to track von Kaenel’s progress or learn more about helping returning veterans should visit sea2sea.org.

Six Mile Resident to Embark on Ride for Veterans

Great Article about Tom’s 2nd ride for Sea2Sea in The Greenville News

Feb 24, 2014

Exerpt from the Article:
(For the full article, click here)

This trip is different from von Kaenel’s first Sea2Sea ride in 2011. This one is not about raising money. He wants to raise awareness about those who have died and about those who live with the weight of war on them. And he also wants to let people know about the organizations that help, such as Upstate Wounded Warriors or Gold Star Mothers.

“The extraordinary people are those people that have lost their loved ones in those conflicts and carry on day after day to try and live a normal life,” he says fighting tears. “The extraordinary people are the ones that come back damaged and hurt from visible and invisible wounds, and the families that are struggling to help them lead a normal life that is safeguarded by our constitution.

Six Mile Resident to Embark on Ride for Veterans

Six Mile Resident to Embark on Ride for Veterans

Bikers travel across country to honor fallen at Beirut Memorial

Link to Original Article on Camp Lejune Globe.com
Post By: 2nd Lt. Sarah Burns Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune

Cycling 3,870 miles across the United States and having another 1,000 more miles to go sounds hard, but to riders of the Sea2Sea Challenge it is nothing compared to the sacrifice service members and their families make every day.

Tom von Kaenel, Alvon Elrod, Chip Minks and other members of the Down East Cycling group from Jacksonville, N.C., biked to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune April 22 to deliver the daily remembrance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial.

“In this daily remembrance ceremony we call out the names of 100 U.S. and 10 British service members who were killed in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11,” said von Kaenel. “The ceremony is the hardest part of the trip. No amount of biking will ever be as hard as the sacrifices our service members and families make every day.”

The ceremonies occurred in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina and now North Carolina.

There was also a special remembrance ceremony at Mount Rushmore honoring all the Native Americans who were killed at Wounded Knee, S.D.

In addition to the ceremonies, the group met with Gold Star Mothers and widows of service members from Iraq and Afghanistan to specifically remember those they lost.

Sea2Sea Foundation was created to raise awareness about the sacrifices U.S. and U.K. service members faced since 9/11. It was launched November 11, 2011, after von Kaenel, a retired American service member and founder of Sea2Sea, recovered from a serious biking accident that demanded immediate medical attention provided by a medical evacuation flight to a military hospital.

“The number of procedures there helped save my life, so I said if I am going to be able to walk again, if I was going to be able to live again, I am going to do this,” von Kaenel said.

Von Kaenel biked to Heathrow International Airport April 16, thus beginning the Sea2Sea challenge.

The American portion of the bike ride began as von Kaenel, Elrod, and Bruce Hammersley, a professional photographer, blogger and the safety vehicle driver, departed Ocean Shores, Wash., April 23. Chip Minks, their childhood friend, flew in from Germany to complete the last 1,000 miles of the ride through Quantico, Va., and into Washington D.C.

The ride is scheduled to conclude July 3 in Arlington, Va., where there will be a final remembrance ceremony followed by an all-night vigil at the chapel at Fort Myer, Va.

At the all-night vigil, they will place an index card with a name for each U.S. service member who was killed in action since 911. These 7,000 cards will serve as a visual reminder of how many 7,000 lives entail.

“The morning of July 4, we will gather up the 7,000 index cards and take them to the Marine Corps Memorial,” von Kaenel said. “There we will give them to cyclists who will carry them to the Lincoln Memorial, where a two-minute ceremony will complete the U.S. portion of this mission.”

“It’s the experience of a lifetime,” Elrod said. “This country is just blessed to have such great people.”

The group rides approximately 60 to 80 miles each day for 11 weeks and uses Sundays for recovery. Support is encouraged at every level whether it be by riding with them or through donations. Their goal is to raise $10 million for U.S. and U.K. service member, and veteran charities.

If you are interested in riding with Sea2Sea, donating or for more information, please visit Sea2Sea.org.

Clemson University Scroll of Honor

Original Article Posted on CityofClemson.com

Clemson University Scroll of Honor – Ceremony begins at 6:00 pm BBQ at Nettles Park after Honor Ceremony
Sea 2 Sea Foundation

Jun 15 2012 – 6:00pm – 8:30pm

Clemson University Scroll of Honor – Ceremony begins at 6:00 pm
BBQ at Nettles Park after Honor Ceremony

The purpose of The Sea2Sea Foundation is to “help those who served”. Specifically, providing assistance to service members, veterans and their families with the goal of transitioning them successfully back into civilian life and society.

After a day of bike riding Thomas von Kaenel and Alvon Elrod will be in Clemson on Friday, June 15th for a remembrance ceremony and a Welter BBQ celebration. The ceremony will be at 6:00pm at the Scroll of Honor on Clemson Campus. The BBQ will be at Nettles Park (near Pendleton) after the ceremony.