UK Quick Facts

UK Quick Facts

Every day our soldiers are putting their lives on the line, willing to make the ultimate sacrifice to ensure our freedom. Many soldiers will pay with their lives and many more will pay with debilitating wounds, physical, mental or spiritual. Sea2Sea supports organizations such as Wounded Warriors in their efforts to help the brave servicemen and women and their families.

Some reasons to support our cause:

Number of UK Military Personnel in Iraq

There are now around 150 British military personnel serving in Iraq.

The total number of UK personnel deployed on Operation TELIC as a whole is higher – around 850 – as this includes personnel involved in the operation but not situated in Iraq itself (for example Royal Navy ships in the Gulf).

The number of UK military personnel deployed in Iraq has changed over time:

  • Peak during Major Combat Operations (March/April 2003): 46,000 (including those stationed outside of Iraq in support of the operation)
  • At the end of May 2003: 18,000
  • At the end of May 2004: 8,600
  • At the end of May 2005: 8,500
  • At the end of May 2006: 7,200
  • At the end of May 2007: 5,500
  • At the end of May 2008: 4,100 (in southern Iraq)
  • At the end of May 2009: 4,100 (in southern Iraq)
  • At the end of Jan 2010: 150

The majority of UK personnel are based in southern Iraq mentoring the Iraqi Navy, with a smaller number based in Baghdad providing training to Iraqi officers as part of the NATO training mission.

(Click to view source)

In Afghanistan as well as providing the headquarters and much of the supporting forces for ISAF, the UK contributed the brigade headquarters, and an infantry battalion. Our contribution initially peaked at 2,100 troops, later decreasing to around 300 personnel after the transfer of ISAF leadership to Turkey in the summer of 2002.

(Click to view source)

Young men who have served in the British Armed Forces are up to three times more likely to take their own lives than their civilian counterparts, research has found.

The study, published in the journal Public Library of Science (PLoS) Medicine, revealed that ex-servicemen under 24 years old were at greatest risk of suicide, with those in lower ranks and shorter military careers proving most vulnerable.

During the study period 233,803 individuals left the Armed Forces, of which 224 took their own lives. Worryingly, the research also found that veterans had a low rate of contact with mental health professionals in the year before death – just 14% for those under 20 years of age and 20% for those under 24 years.

(Click to view source)

The Financial Cost to the UK

The cost of UK Military Operations in Afghanistan

The Ministry of Defense identifies the costs of military operations in terms of the net additional costs it has incurred, over and above planned expenditure on defense. The costs of our operations in Afghanistan come from the Treasury Special Reserve.

The overall cost of operations in Afghanistan in 2001-2002 was £221m.
The cost for 2002-2003 was £311m.
The cost for 2003-2004 was £46m.
The cost for 2004-2005 was £67m.
The cost for 2005-2006 was £199m.
The cost for 2006-2007 was approx £738m.

We do not report future year costs as operations are by their nature changeable.

(Click to view source)

Cost of UK Military action in Iraq

The costs of our operations in Iraq come from the Treasury Special Reserve. The Ministry of Defense identifies the costs of military operations in terms of the net additional costs it has incurred, over and above planned expenditure on defense. The costs for the following financial years were:

  • 2002/03 – £847M
  • 2003/04 – £1,311M
  • 2004/05 – £910M
  • 2005/06 – £958M
  • 2006/07 – £956M
  • 2007/08 – £1,457M
  • 2008/09 – £1,381M
  • 2009/10 – £342M

The costs for 2003/04 include the costs of combat operations from 1 April 2003, the costs incurred in maintaining and supporting subsequent peacekeeping operations and the costs of recuperating operational capability afterwards.

Reconstruction across Iraq

The UK has pledged a total commitment of £744 million towards reconstruction in Iraq.  The UK pledged an initial £544m for reconstruction projects at the Madrid Conference in 2003.  The then Chancellor, Gordon Brown, increased this by £100m when he visited Basra in November 2006, and the former Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett pledged a further £100m in May 2007.

(Click to view source link)

Sea2Sea is not responsible for the content of external sites, though we try to maintain accurate data.

Comments are closed.